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Tell Your Friends

Tell Your Friends

Prevention is key. Although genetics can play a role, it's important to eat healthy, limit alcohol consumption, exercise regularly, get annual check-ups, and practice self-exams.  Here are 7 tips from the Mayo Clinic to help reduce your risk.  And it's never too late to start a healthier lifestyle, even if you've been diagnosed, are going through treatment or have completed treatment.  Prevention is always important and it can start today.
You Are Not Alone

You Are Not Alone

One in eight women will get breast cancer in her lifetime.  Every two minutes, a woman in the U.S. is diagnosed with breast cancer.  If you've been diagnosed, seek out resources including friends, friends-of-friends, support groups, cancer support centers and more.  This American Cancer Society site is a place to start to find resources.

Build Your Team

Build Your Team

Anyone who has received a cancer diagnosis needs emotional support as well as medical support. Find your team, trust and rely on them to help you.  Try resources like Caring Bridge and share your story with those you trust.  You don't have to do this alone, find your team and let them help you.  This article from the Cancer Support Community explains some of your potential medical team member roles.  You may be interacting with only a few of these or you may have all of them.  Just explore, discuss and communicate your needs and develop a team you trust.
Eat the Rainbow

Eat the Rainbow

Making sure your diet includes significant amounts of fruits and vegetables is key to a healthy lifestyle.  Many nutritionists recommend to "eat the rainbow" every day.  It's a great way to ensure you're getting a wide variety of vitamins and nutrients without having to think about it too much.  Try to meet every color category at least once a day and you can take out some of the guess-work.  Here's an article from Healthline that explains the concept in more detail, including why and how you should consider this method.
Live Like a Survivor

Live Like a Survivor

Breast cancer survivors with the greatest longevity maintain a healthy weight, are physically active, and eat a nutritious diet that includes fruits, vegetables, lots of water and limited saturated fats.  Even during treatment, you can start a lifestyle change.  You don't need to do it all at once, but it's never too early to think about how you'll not only survive but thrive.  And don't forget about your mental health as well.  Here's a great article from the Mayo Clinic about managing your life and especially your emotions after treatment.
Find Safe Resources

Find Safe Resources

There are great resources out there for any questions you may have about a diagnosis, so seek them out. During this scary time, general search engine queries are not your friend. Instead, find survivors via friends and online support groups. And talk to your doctors and nurses to make sure that you’re getting the facts about your case from qualified professionals. Try this Cancer Research Institute site for more information.